Latest Discussions : Miscellaneous

scott

10:37AM | 10/19/98
I recently purchased a home which has a two car detached garage. The problem is that the garage doesn't appear to have been built on any type of foundation or footings. There is a concrete floor that is severely deteriorated and the walls seem to rest either on the concrete floor or directly on the ground. I am concerned because without any solid support under them the walls have sagged down and the front wall of the structure is actually "loose" on the ground. (ie. I can wiggle it). I am wondering if it is at all possible to temporarily support one wall at a time, dig out beneath the existing wall, and pour a concrete footing under each wall. I know that even if it is possible it is no small task, but I wanted some opinions on it. Any advice or suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

Scott

DomPepe

05:58AM | 10/20/98
Scott,

I am not an expert, but it sounds like you
should rebuild this garage from scratch.

You do not mention how old the garage is.
What kind of condition are the studs in?
Since you say they were on the ground, are
they rotted or beginning to rot?
If so, you should truly consider demolition
and building a new one.
It might be easier and cheaper with this
suggestion.

Email me if you have any questions.

Dom

Mickey

12:17PM | 10/26/98
Scott,
I received the same information that the other genteman provided, so we were in the same boat. My garage floor was all craked and broken up, both garage door openings were out of square and the roof was just starting to deteriorate, in fact one area even rotted away. However, I salvaged the whole 2 car garage by rehanging new garage doors, reshingling the whole roof, reframing the openings, adding new and extra supports, and tuck pointed the cracks in the floor. That was at least 90% less costly than replacing all the concrete, and building a new garage. You may even go a step further by having asphalt laid down on top of the newly tuck pointed floor. If you go that route, make sure you add some preventative measures so this won't happen again by adding or replacing the gutters around the garage. Also, before you re-do anything, see if you can get a quote on having your garage jacked up off of the floor and having them refit it on the newly square and repaired construction. I didn't have to go that far, even though the garage isn't completely square, I can live without the extra five thousand on my creditcard.
Good luck,
Mickey

Mickey

12:18PM | 10/26/98
Scott,
I received the same information that the other genteman provided, so we were in the same boat. My garage floor was all craked and broken up, both garage door openings were out of square and the roof was just starting to deteriorate, in fact one area even rotted away. However, I salvaged the whole 2 car garage by rehanging new garage doors, reshingling the whole roof, reframing the openings, adding new and extra supports, and tuck pointed the cracks in the floor. That was at least 90% less costly than replacing all the concrete, and building a new garage. You may even go a step further by having asphalt laid down on top of the newly tuck pointed floor. If you go that route, make sure you add some preventative measures so this won't happen again by adding or replacing the gutters around the garage. Also, before you re-do anything, see if you can get a quote on having your garage jacked up off of the floor and having them refit it on the newly square and repaired construction. I didn't have to go that far, even though the garage isn't completely square, I can live without the extra five thousand on my creditcard.
Good luck,
Mickey

Mickey

12:18PM | 10/26/98
Scott,
I received the same information that the other genteman provided, so we were in the same boat. My garage floor was all craked and broken up, both garage door openings were out of square and the roof was just starting to deteriorate, in fact one area even rotted away. However, I salvaged the whole 2 car garage by rehanging new garage doors, reshingling the whole roof, reframing the openings, adding new and extra supports, and tuck pointed the cracks in the floor. That was at least 90% less costly than replacing all the concrete, and building a new garage. You may even go a step further by having asphalt laid down on top of the newly tuck pointed floor. If you go that route, make sure you add some preventative measures so this won't happen again by adding or replacing the gutters around the garage. Also, before you re-do anything, see if you can get a quote on having your garage jacked up off of the floor and having them refit it on the newly square and repaired construction. I didn't have to go that far, even though the garage isn't completely square, I can live without the extra five thousand on my creditcard.
Good luck,
Mickey


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