Latest Discussions : Painting

sunnyfrogp

11:29AM | 08/02/03
Member Since: 08/01/03
6 lifetime posts
I would like to paint a rough-cut beam that is in my family room. What is the best way to prepare the surface re sanding, priming, etc.

metallica1939

05:19PM | 08/02/03
Member Since: 06/25/03
4 lifetime posts
I would belt sand the beam first, to get rid of the really rough pats, then go to a finer sanding method to smooth it out. Don't know about priming though.

sunnyfrogp

06:36PM | 08/02/03
Member Since: 08/01/03
6 lifetime posts
Thanks for the info. I forgot to mention that the beam has a dk stain on it. House was built in 1980. This is a main support beam. Should I clean it with TSP before priming? Which primer? Would prefer not to use an oil based one, due to odor.

Workenstiff

07:48PM | 08/02/03
Member Since: 05/03/03
48 lifetime posts
Depending on the wood type, youre probably going to have to use a oil primer to seal knots from bleeding through, if there are any in the wood. Kilz ( which also comes in a water base) is good. There are other primers also that are made for priming over stain and hard to cover areas. Read the label on some of the most popular ones , such as Zinnzer, Binz, or Kilz. TSP is mostly for painted walls and the likes, not really for wood, so i would just get it clean with a rag if its that dusty. The primer will do the rest, (unless its oily or something) Also they have great additive products at the local paint store that you add to primer or paint to eliminate the odor. They do a pretty good job. Just add it to the paint, thats it.

sunnyfrogp

01:49PM | 08/03/03
Member Since: 08/01/03
6 lifetime posts
Had great luck with Zinzer water-based primer on a recent paint project on knotty pine paneling. However, I do notice some sap on this beam, so maybe oil-based is the way to go. Guess that means I have to use an oil-based paint as well?

retisin

03:02PM | 08/04/03
Member Since: 05/19/03
457 lifetime posts
You will want a oil based primer and stain blocker at that otherwise it will bleed through.

5slb6

01:39AM | 08/05/03
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
You can use a latex finish paint over the oil based primer an dit will do fine.

sunnyfrogp

11:26AM | 08/05/03
Member Since: 08/01/03
6 lifetime posts
Thanks-you have all been very helpful. One last questions-what grade or grit of sandpaper should I use?

5slb6

01:41AM | 08/06/03
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
It depends on how smooth you want get the wood but i would think you would want to start with 80 grit and work your way down to 120 grit sand paper. You will find this at your local paint store along with the paint you will need.

retisin

05:16PM | 08/07/03
Member Since: 05/19/03
457 lifetime posts
The rough cut beam are you trying to smooth it or just etch it for the primer?
If you think you need to sand it 1st before priming use a fine grit to keep the rough look board or use a coarse grit to smooth the board down some.
if you just sanding for painting purposes then use a 120 grit the prime.

BV002959

09:55PM | 01/06/14
I appraise houses for a bank. Painting unpainted wood always lowers house values,... by thousands of dollars. Paint makes inspectors nervous (old rot?)and now with all the fake wood trim and laminated particle board, no one will take the time to check. I know that the cottage style magazines tell you to paint everything, including your wooden furniture and hardwood floors, but don't. If you have a stain on the beam, try cleaning it really well and then using oxalic acid or other concentrated wood brighteners. If that does not work, try using a semitransparent stain on the stained part only that matches the unstained parts of the beam. It will be easier, and will save you money if you ever sell.


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