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Bob Vila Radio: Fire Extinguisher Inspection

Check your fire extinguishers at least twice a year to ensure proper functioning in case you ever need them. Here's how to evaluate its condition.

You know you should test your smoke alarm twice a year, but what about your fire extinguisher? If yours is at the back of the closet where you stashed it ten years ago, chances are it won’t be much help in a fire. Here’s how to check your fire extinguisher to make sure it’s ready if you ever need it.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON FIRE EXTINGUISHER INSPECTION or read the text below:

Fire Extinguisher Inspection

Photo: nbclosangeles.com

The first thing to check is the pressure gauge, which will tell you if your fire extinguisher is overcharged, undercharged, or just right. If it’s not properly charged, contact your local firehouse first to see if they can help. If they can’t, they can at least point you in the right direction.

Check the fire extinguisher for dents, rust, or other signs of damage. If you see any, it’s time to dispose of it, because a crack in a pressurized fire extinguisher can cause it to explode.

Make sure the tamper seal and the pin are in place. If your extinguisher has an inspection tag, check to see when it was last professionally inspected, if ever.

It’s a very good idea to stick to the recommended schedule for professional maintenance. If you have any doubts, contact a local fire safety company for guidance.

Finally, don’t put your extinguisher back in that closet—for it to be useful, you need to be able to get to it quickly.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.

 


How To: Clean Copper

Do you have copper that's looking tarnished and dingy? Freshen it up using items that you probably already have in your pantry. Here's how.

How to Clean Copper

Photo: shutterstock.com

Copper can be a finicky material; it tarnishes easily even when subject to normal wear. Fortunately, using only common household items that most people keep on hand, it doesn’t take much to clean copper and renew its earthy and robust shine. Choose your approach from the following options based on the supplies you already have in your pantry.

How to Clean Copper - Texture

Photo: shutterstock.com

SALT AND VINEGAR
It’s a winning combination, not only as a flavoring for potato chips, but also as a cleaning solution for copper. Simply sprinkle salt over the object you want to clean, then thoroughly scrub it with a vinegar-soaked cloth. (Expect the cloth to get dirty as you work; if it gets really dirty, swap in a new one.) Once you have rubbed away all the tarnish, rinse the object under the faucet to remove the salt residue. At this point, the copper should be looking a lot better than it did.

Do dents and depressions in the copper still harbor hard-to-reach dirt and grime? If so, apply salt directly to those areas, then head to the bathroom and retrieve an old toothbrush. After dipping its bristles in the vinegar, use the toothbrush to scrub the dirty or oxidized parts of the copper that eluded your cleaning efforts the first time around.

If the steps above leave you frustrated, there’s still one more thing you can try. In a large pot, mix one cup of vinegar, one tablespoon of salt, and four or five cups of water. Place the entire copper object into the pot, then bring the water to a boil. Leave it boiling until you begin to see the tarnish falling away from the copper. Once you’ve taken the copper out of the pot, it may be necessary to do some more scrubbing, but now it should be significantly easier to get results.

LEMONS OR LIMES
If there’s no vinegar in your cupboard this week, you can rely instead on any number of common household acids—prime examples are lemon or lime juice. (But know that in a pinch, anything acidic, even tomato ketchup, can be used.) Cut the citrus fruit in half, sprinkle salt on its exposed flesh, then rub the lemon or lime against the tarnished copper. Finish by wiping the copper object thoroughly with a dry cloth, polishing away all the accumulations marring the surface, which the combination of acidity and salt should have effectively loosened up for you.


How To: Remove a Popcorn Ceiling

Popcorn ceilings can make a room appear dated and dark. Fortunately, you can remove all that textured coating to reveal the smoother surface below. Here's how.

How to Remove Popcorn Ceiling

Photo: shutterstock.com

For a significant chunk of the 20th century, from the 1950s through the ’80s, the ceilings in many new homes—particularly in bedrooms—came with a rough, stippled texture that become known as a “popcorn” finish. People tout the sound-dampening properties of popcorn ceilings, but I think they really caught on for a pretty simple reason: They hide imperfections and made life a little easier for professional builders. One major drawback is that, because they don’t reflect very much light, popcorn ceilings tend to eat up the light in a room. Another con is that many homeowners consider popcorn ceilings to be just plain ugly. Fortunately, it’s easy to remove popcorn ceilings, and although it can be a very messy and labor-intensive affair, the transformative results can make the effort well worth it.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS
- Plastic sheeting
- Masking tape
- Dust mask
- Protective goggles
- Wide putty knife
- Ladder
- Garden sprayer
- Metal file
- Paint

STEP 1
Before doing anything else, it’s critically important that you get the popcorn tested by an EPA-certified laboratory. In homes built before 1982, asbestos was a main ingredient in spray-on ceiling textures. If yours turns out to contain asbestos, then I very strongly advise you to bring in trained professionals who are licensed to deal with hazardous materials. If, on the other hand, the test indicates that your ceiling has a paper-based popcorn treatment, you can handle its removal the do-it-yourself way. Because the process involves water, however, it’s prudent to cut electrical power to the room where you’re going to be working.

How to Remove a Popcorn Ceiling - Detail

Photo: dwellingonadime.com

STEP 2
There’s no getting around it: To remove a popcorn ceiling, you’ve got to make a mess. By properly preparing the room beforehand, however, you can minimize the amount of cleanup required once the project is completed. After you have removed all furniture from the room, cover the floor—and the bottom 16 inches of each wall—with thick plastic sheeting. Secure that sheeting in place with masking tape.

Upper walls too must be protected; do so by applying a strip of tape around the perimeter of the room, one quarter-inch below the ceiling. Then fasten plastic sheeting to that initial strip by means of an additional tape layer. Bear in mind that ceiling fixtures may hinder progress, so if there’s a ceiling fan, medallion molding, or hanging light fixture in the room, you may wish to take it down at this early stage.

STEP 3
Divide the ceiling into four-foot-square sections. Next, using the garden sprayer, thoroughly moisten the initial section, letting the water soak in for 10 or 15 minutes. After enough time has elapsed, position the ladder under the moistened section, put on your dust mask and protective goggles, then climb up. Holding a putty knife at a 30-degree angle to the ceiling, commence scraping the popcorn away. The method is to spray, wait, and then scrape. In this manner, work your way around the room, one section at a time.

STEP 4
Continue until you have removed the popcorn ceiling to reveal the drywall surface beneath. Given that you’ve put so much work into preparing the room, fastidiously covering the walls and floor with plastic sheeting, now would be an opportune moment to prime and paint the ceiling. If you decide to go this route, wait until the final coat has dried before removing the sheeting. But whatever you decide, don’t forget to reinstall ceiling fixtures and restore power to the room. In the newly popcorn-free space, you should notice that everything seems a lot brighter. Isn’t that so? Enjoy it!


Bob Vila Radio: Ferns

Ferns remain popular with homeowners and renters alike, thanks to the ancient plant's attractive fronds and forgiving care requirements.

Leafy, green, and graceful, ferns bring drama and texture to the garden. They are attractive in rock gardens and make effective background plantings and ground covers. Their frilly fronds, some with subtle variegations, lend character and color to shady spots. If chosen wisely, a fern can enhance your landscape for many years.

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ferns

Photo: eofdreams.com

Ferns have an ancient lineage. They first appeared on earth more than 300 million years ago and have over time adapted to a diverse range of environments. Although you can find a fern suited to almost any conditions, they generally prefer shady, moist locations and loose soils with a high concentration of organic matter.

One of their big attractions is that ferns are easy to grow and maintain. Once established, they need little care. They typically don’t require fertilizer, they’re unattractive to pests, and they’re not subject to disease. You’ll have greatest success, however, if you stick with ferns that are suited to your region. In colder climates, plant ferns in the spring; in warmer areas, in the fall. Water regularly—don’t let the soil dry out—and mulch to help the plant retain moisture.

One caveat: Tempting though it may be, don’t collect ferns from the wild—you could mistakenly end up with highly endangered or highly invasive species, and you shouldn’t have either in your garden.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


What Would Bob Do? Installing a Drop Ceiling

Although drop ceilings have a bit of a cringe factor, they can be useful for hiding that tangle of pipes and wiring that inhabits the upper reaches of the basement. If you're trying to fix up a downstairs space, a drop ceiling may be your best option. Read on for the installation basics.

How to Install a Drop Ceiling

Photo: askdesignfirst.com

I’m interested in installing a drop ceiling in my basement rec room. Do you have any helpful hints for a do-it-yourselfer taking on this project for the first time?

A drop ceiling—also known as a suspended ceiling—conceals the plumbing or electrical work running overhead while allowing easy access to those elements in the future, should any adjustments or repairs become necessary. If you’re familiar with drop ceilings, then you are likely aware that some people dislike how they look. When the choice is between a drop ceiling and a messy warren of exposed mechanicals, however, homeowners often treat the former as a necessary evil.

We tend to think of ceilings as being solid and permanent, closely related to the structure of a home. But a drop ceiling isn’t that; rather, it’s a screen formed by a metal grid and the movable ceiling tiles placed into that framework. When it comes to the tiles, you have lots of choices. Countless textures and patterns are available, some even resembling tin or wood. In addition, many tiles feature soundproofing properties, valuable in a basement workshop or kid’s playroom.

It’s certainly possible to purchase the parts of a drop ceiling in an à la carte fashion, piece by piece—and you may wish to do so if you’re working in a compact utility space. But most of the time it’s cheaper to opt for the grid kits commonly available online and in local home improvement centers. Bear in mind that because one kit typically covers an eight-by-eight ceiling expanse, you’ll probably need to buy several if you’re trying to properly outfit an entire basement or a large garage space.

How to Install a Drop Ceiling - Detail

Photo: familyhandyman.com

The average drop ceiling kit includes the following:

Wall molding—L-shaped metal strips that run along the ceiling perimeter, supporting tiles on one edge

Main beams—panel supports that span the distance from wall to wall and run perpendicular to the joists

Cross tees—panel supports that are installed parallel to the joists and between the main beams of the grid

Hanger wire and fasteners—hardware that ties the main beams of the grid to the wood ceiling joists

Installing a drop ceiling yourself? Rest assured that the process isn’t overly difficult, but for best results be sure to start with a detailed plan. If you’ve ever laid a floor, then you know the trick is to arrange the boards in such a way that you don’t end up with small, narrow pieces around the perimeter. The same principle applies here.

On graph paper, sketch the ceiling to scale. Include the location of any ceiling fixtures that need to be taken into account (for example, recessed lighting or ceiling fans). Continue sketching different arrangements until you strike upon one that allows for ceiling tiles with the widest possible diameter to go around the edge of the space.

Most ceiling tiles can be cut to size with a simple utility knife, if necessary. During installation, I recommend using a stepladder with an integral paint tray that can hold your tools and materials, saving you the hassle of repeatedly climbing up and down. Also, it’s wise to wear safety glasses; you’ll be directly below the action.

A parting thought: If all you’re looking to do is hide a cracked or stained ceiling—in other words, if there are no pipes, cables, or ducts to accommodate—then you may want to check out many of the direct-to-ceiling products on the market today. They don’t hang on a grid; instead, they install directly to the ceiling via adhesives, screws, or a combination of clips and tracks. In the right context, they can be real time- and effort-savers.


Weekend Projects: 5 Unique and Easy DIY Pendant Lights for Any Room

Pendant lights are functional, versatile, style-laden, and occasionally pricey. Make your own by purchasing a lighting kit and tricking it out with one of these creative pendant ideas.

Nobody wants to spend time in a room with bad lighting, but how do you avoid it? Well, there’s strength in numbers: Outfit each important space with a variety of fixtures, so you can always match the room lighting to the activity you are doing. Pendants, one of the most popular types of fixtures, are also among the most practical, because they can provide either task lighting or general-purpose overhead illumination. They’re often stylish too, introducing a pop of personality to the decor. The downside? Pendants can be expensive. But if you like taking matters into your own hands, creating a DIY pendant light doesn’t need to be a costly affair. And the the results, as demonstrated by the favorite five examples below, can often be nothing short of extraordinary.

 

1. GO GLOBAL

DIY Pendant Light - Globe

Photo: homeiswhatyoumakeit.com

If you’ve got an old globe in your attic—or if you recently bought one at a thrift store—why not refashion it into a DIY pendant light? All you need is a lighting kit, the kind sold at local hardware stores. Halve the globe along the equator (where else?), then decorate the cut edge with ball fringe—or don’t! The choice is yours.

 

2. ARRANGE FLOWERS

DIY Pendant Light - Flowers

Photo: papernstichblog.com

Here’s a project sure to provoke conversation among the guests at your next party. It’s a DIY pendant light festooned with flowers. To make yours, start out with a wire basket, then use wire to attach fresh or faux flora. Add a light socket and a low-wattage bulb before hanging the assembly over the bar or buffet table. Wow.

 

3. SAVE PAPER

DIY Pendant Light - Paper

Photo: designsponge.com

The unique look of this striking DIY pendant light springs from an unlikely source: scraps of paper. Because wastepaper comes in so many colors and textures, there’s virtually no limit to the designs you might achieve with a set of basic supplies—scissors, glue, and a simple, dime-a-dozen white lampshade.

 

4. RUN WIRES 

DIY Pendant Light - Wire

Photo: abeautifulmess.com

Cage lights are a common sight on construction sites, and they are also popping up in the homes of those who love industrial-style decorating. Here, A Beautiful Mess offers a modern, minimalist take on the cage light that features three strands of spray-painted wire looping around a sculptural incandescent bulb.

 

5. THREAD LEATHER

DIY Pendant Light - Leather

Photo: poppytalk.com

It’s not necessarily going to take hours and hours, but in order to complete a project like this—a leather DIY pendant light replete with subtle sophistication—you’ll need to do two things: one, plan out the project before you begin, and two, execute some tricky maneuvering of the material. Easy? No. Delightful? Absolutely.


Bob Vila Radio: Preventing Moths

During the rush to stow away winter clothes and blankets and welcome the arrival of spring, don't forget to moth-proof them. Follow these precautions to make sure these pesky insects stay out of your winter wardrobe.

This is the time of year when we shed our winter wardrobes and slip into warm-weather fabrics. To be sure that your clothes and blankets come out of storage in one piece next fall, take a few moments now to moth-proof them.

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Preventing Moths

Photo: columbiashelving.com

One important step before packing up woolens is getting them cleaned. Those telltale holes in moth-eaten sweaters are the work of the larvae, which can cling to clothing invisibly and wreak havoc while they’re stored. Wash or dry-clean your items first to be sure they are free of larvae before you store them away.

Store anything made of wool, fur, or cashmere in an airtight container—you don’t want adult moths getting in to lay eggs and create new larvae. Plastic tubs with airtight lids will do the trick, as will Ziploc bags.

The smell of cedar repels adult moths, but it takes a lot of the scent to be effective, and you’ll need to replace or sand cedar blocks or balls to maintain the intensity of the smell.

The one thing you probably don’t want to use is the old-fashioned mothball. Not only do mothballs smell bad, but they can be toxic when inhaled. You would not only have to keep them in an airtight container, but you’d have to clean all those clothes again in the fall to get rid of the fumes and the smell.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


5 Things to Do with… Artificial Turf

Today's synthetics are a far cry from your father's artificial turf. New products more closely resemble the real thing and can be incorporated into some authentically creative DIY projects. Check out just a few.

When artificial turf came onto the scene in the mid-1960s, it offered several advantages over natural grass lawns, ease of maintenance first and foremost. Over the years, advancements in the design and manufacture of artificial turf have made it much more realistic, both in looks and texture. That improvement has not gone unnoticed, inspiring creative types to test out the material in a variety of DIY projects in and around the home. Scroll down to see five of our favorites!

 

1. GROW A WALL

Artificial Turf DIY - Wall

Photo: thehomedepot.com

Here’s an artificial turf DIY project that blurs the boundary between a home office and the leafy yard beyond its window. Unlike wallpaper, fake grass doesn’t call for the use of adhesives; you can nail or staple the green stuff directly over drywall or plaster, creating a distinctive look that can last just as long as you want it, whether a single day or multiple years.

 

2. TEND A TABLE RUNNER

Artificial Turf DIY - Table Runner

Photo: notonhighstreet.com

For a spring-season dinner party in the dining room or a casual backyard get-together, why not repurpose artificial turf as a table runner that’s bound to be a conversation starter among guests? Using a utility knife, you should have little trouble cutting the product into a strip of the appropriate length and width for your table.

 

3. SPROUT A STOOL

Artificial Turf DIY - Stools

Photo: 221vision.com

Introduce a summer theme to your man cave or customize the stools at your backyard bar with seat covers just like these, made from two pieces of artificial turf cleverly joined by means of a heavy-duty sewing machine. Come on, could there be a better way to settle in for an evening daiquiri, mai tai, or piña colada?

 

4. PLANT A PILLOW

Artificial Turf DIY - Pillows

Photo: sfgate.com

Quirky and delightful for any sitting area, whether inside the home or on a deck, porch, or patio, these artificial turf DIY throw pillows are as eye-catching as they are easy to make. Simply cut a large sheet of turf into a pair of equal-size squares, place padding between the two pieces, then finish by sewing the edges closed.

 

5. CULTIVATE A CARPET

Artificial Turf DIY - Floor

Photo: diynetwork.com

When used as a floor covering, artificial turf behaves similarly to traditional carpeting, at least in the sense that both are relatively hassle-free to maintain with a vacuum. But whereas wall-to-wall carpeting isn’t a surface you would typically paint, artificial turf all but cries out for stripes of white to approximate yard lines.


The Appeal of Bamboo Flooring

Appreciated for its graphic patterns and environmental sustainability, bamboo flooring has become a popular option for homeowners in recent years. Is a bamboo floor the best choice for you? Let's look at the facts behind the trend.

Morning Star Anji Bamboo Flooring

Lumber Liquidators' Morning Star Handscraped Strand Anji Bamboo Flooring.

Floors are an essential and important element in an interior design scheme. Small wonder, then, that the eye-catching patterns of bamboo flooring have been attracting attention. Made from the bamboo plant—a grass—this style of flooring allows homeowners to make a bold design statement underfoot. Another reason for the buzz? Bamboo is considered an eco-friendly flooring option. “While bamboo flooring is unique and beautiful, it’s also a fast-growing grass that reaches maturity in four to six years,” reports Chelsea Fossum, a buyer for Lumber Liquidators. “This makes it a highly renewable resource that is gaining popularity in home design.”

How It’s Made
To make bamboo flooring, the stalks of the bamboo plant are cut into thin strips and bonded together in layers with the use of an adhesive resin. They can be layered horizontally, with the strips facing up to reveal the natural shape of the plant, or vertically, with the strips turned on their ends and pressed one against the other, resulting in a striated pattern. A third process, which creates a product known as “strand-woven bamboo,” involves shredding the bamboo stalks, mixing the fibers with adhesive, and pressing them together into highly durable flooring sheets.

Horizontal-grain, vertical-grain, and strand-woven bamboo flooring are commonly referred to as “solid bamboo,” because they are made up entirely of bamboo strips or fibers. Another option on the market is called “engineered bamboo,” which takes a thin strip of solid bamboo and adheres it to the top of another type of wood such as plywood or fiberboard. The main advantage of engineered bamboo is ease of installation; engineered planks can be floated above a subfloor without need of nails or adhesives, while solid planks are installed much like traditional hardwood.

Bellawood Spice Bamboo Flooring

Bellawood Spice Ultra-Strand Bamboo Flooring at Lumber Liquidators.

Colors and Patterns
Bamboo flooring is available in a wide range of colors from pale straw to deep mahogany tones and everything in between. Natural bamboo resembles light woods like ash and beech. To create other colors, bamboo can be stained or carbonized, a process that produces pleasing deeper hues. Carbonization, however, is thought to degrade the durability of bamboo floors, so darker colors may not be best for high-traffic areas.

The variety of patterns in bamboo flooring is truly one of its biggest draws for homeowners—from the natural silhouettes visible in horizontal-grain planks to the linear quality of vertical-grain planks to the graphic quality of strand-woven designs. Which variety to use in a room of your house will depend on your personal taste and the overall style of the space.

Care and Maintenance
Regular sweeping and occasional mopping with a damp cloth are all that’s needed to keep bamboo flooring looking its best. If your home has high foot traffic, pets, or young children, thoughtfully positioned area rugs may be a worthwhile investment. As with hardwood floors, placing felt pads on the bottom of furniture legs can help extend the life of bamboo.

Supreme Bamboo Horizontal Carbonized Flooring

Horizontal Carbonized Supreme Bamboo Flooring from Lumber Liquidators.

Cost
At about $3 to $8 per square foot, the price of bamboo is comparable to other flooring options such as hardwood, carpeting, or tile. It’s worth paying a little more for a higher-quality product for increased durability. Warranties are often a good indicator of quality; planks with a longer warranty are generally more durable. Households with young children or anyone with respiratory sensitivity will want to inquire about VOC levels before making a purchase, because the chemicals sometimes used in manufacturing can off-gas in the home. For some of the top-rated bamboo floors, click here.

To help you find the best pattern for a particular room, think about the other colors, fabrics, or finishes that will share the space with the bamboo floor, much as you would when considering paint swatches. More graphic patterns lend themselves to use in modern interiors, while simpler designs are typically suited to more traditional decor.

 

This post has been brought to you by Lumber Liquidators. Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com.


Expansion Tanks: What Are They and Why Are They Important?

When water is heated, it expands, increasing the pressure in closed heating systems. Over time, these pressure fluctuations can damage the system's components. An expansion tank is designed to alleviate this pressure and extend the life of your system. Here's how it works.

Expansion Tank Diagram

Expansion Tank Diagram: SupplyHouse.com

Homeowners looking to maximize the efficiency and life expectancy of their heating and cooling systems may want to consider installing an expansion tank as an easy and inexpensive means of regulating water pressure and preventing costly damage to other components, including pipes.

An expansion tank is designed to relieve pressure in both potable water and closed hydronic heating systems. It ensures that constant pressure is maintained within the pipes so they do not get damaged from excess pressure. “An expansion tank in a heating system is an invaluable component that protects the entire system from the increased pressure and volume caused by heating,” asserts Daniel O’Brian, a technical expert from online retailer SupplyHouse.com.

“When water is heated, it expands,” O’Brian explains. “In a closed heating system there is only so much space in the pipes and the boiler. If the water is taking up more space and has nowhere to go, the pressure will increase and possibly damage the system, generally at its weakest points, until a leak or even a burst pipe results. An expansion tank is designed to relieve the stress, thereby increasing the life of the components in your entire heating system.”

Extrol Expansion Tank

Extrol 4.4-Gallon Expansion Tank at SupplyHouse.com

Expansion tanks work by equalizing pressure throughout the system. An expansion tank is a small tank divided in two sections by a rubber diaphragm. One side is connected to the pipes of the heating system and contains water. The other side is dry and contains pressurized air, set at approximately 12 psi. As hot water enters the heating system, the pressure in the system increases. As pressure increases, the diaphragm in the expansion tank is pushed down. This compresses the air in the tank, creating more space for excess water to enter. This relieves excess pressure in the system and prevents pipes in the system from being damaged.

Installing an expansion tank is a relatively simple process that can typically be completed in less than an hour by a handy do-it-yourselfer. Some local building codes may require installation by a licensed plumber, however, so you should check with your municipal building department before proceeding with any installation.

Expansion tanks vary in capacity, ranging from tanks that hold as little as two gallons to large tanks that hold several hundred gallons. To determine the size needed for your system, online retailer SupplyHouse.com offers a handy Expansion Tank Sizing Calculator on its Web site. Use it to determine the size and model of the expansion tank that’s best suited for your system.

Prices for expansion tanks start at about $30 for small residential tanks and climb up to $800 to $1,000 for larger, commercial tanks. Leading brands include Extrol expansion tanks, manufactured by Amtrol, which are used for hydronic heating systems; the Watts ET series and Bell & Gossett HFT expansion tanks, both designed for use with closed hydronic heating systems; and Therm-X-trol expansion tanks, for use with potable water open systems.

If your home already has an expansion tank in place, you may want to check it periodically to make sure that the tank is functioning. To check if the expansion tank is working properly, simply place your hand on the tank and feel its temperature. The top portion of the tank should feel warm to the touch, and the bottom portion of the tank should be room temperature. If the entire tank is warm, it is likely that the tank has completely filled with hot water, which occurs only if the diaphragm fails. If this happens, the tank must be replaced immediately.

Online retailer SupplyHouse.com offers a large selection of expansion tanks and accessories from the top manufacturers in the industry. To learn more, watch the video below or visit SupplyHouse.com.

 

This post has been brought to you by SupplyHouse.com. Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com.