COMMUNITY FORUM

MistressEll

05:37AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 01/30/05
361 lifetime posts
perhaps the drainage system for your foundation footings on the "up slope" side have been choked off (don't know if you have pvc or clay pipes filled with stone in a stone bed befow the backfill type of thing) and its not affording you the drainage anymore and the buildup of pressure from the up-slope side is 'strong-arming' or pushing the house -- could be. 18 years and not careful maintance of the grade, and perhaps gaps near the foundation allowing more top soil/rain wash down might account for it showing up now (regards to K2's comment that it would show up after 16-18 years) or even later. Again an engineer could assist you in eliminating many factors and coming up with some very reasonable hypothosises as to a cause and smart plan.

MistressEll

05:49AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 01/30/05
361 lifetime posts
regards tomh "unusual" its really not when its a "walk out" basement on the downside of the slope-type arrangement with a higher slope (home being built in the middle of a hill or mountain) when horizontal tie-ins aren't established as well as deep footings to rock layer (like 30 or more feet depending on where it is). Homes slide off hills all the time in california in excessive rain fall, in Kansas this is a notoriously common event, soon after construction, 5-7 years later, even 20 years later. also ground cover/construction "up hill" or de-forestation "up hill" can increase water run-off surface run-off as well as underground run-off and add additional stresses that may not have existed when her home was first designed/built. For example maybe a home completed up-hill seven years ago, and ground coverage, reduced "up hill" absorbtion, increased run-off and eventually added stress and washed out on the down'hill side, or choked off her "drain tiles" or whatever. perhaps up hill there was some clearing event of vegatation and the absorbant loamy layer has finally erroded over time and now not as much absorbtion is taking place and she has increased run-off issues that are just now rearing their "ugly head".

Again...consult an engineer he can also determine the degree of hydrostatic and other pressures on your up-hill side to your foundation and footings, and his "eagle eye" will also tell you if the effect you dreamed about and think you see regards to "tilt" actually exists in the first place.

k2

06:13AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Thanks for the mud jacking info, L. OK, sounds like it's not appropriate.

It had been recommended by a realtor we know (he had had part of his house done that way and had highly recommended the company). For my case, I never looked into it as I was looking at a new concrete footing and steel support.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

MistressEll

06:48AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 01/30/05
361 lifetime posts
yeah realtors usually aren't in it for the long term solutions, just usualy cheap quick fixes to dump it on the next unsuspecting soul. I wouldn't trust a realtor's advice on anything other than apparent market value (with a grain of salt) and comparison sales information in the local area, period. Would never trust their recommendations for financing sources, closing lawyers, or home inspectors either, and I'd never EVER trust a realtor who was listing a property to be my seller's representive (conflict of interest both directions)! Frankly my opinion of Realtors is about equal or LOWER than "used car salesmen". I trust them about as far as I can spit (and I usually end up spitting on my chest because I can't spit worth a dang!).

MistressEll

06:52AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 01/30/05
361 lifetime posts
forgot to mention/clarify that realtors' advice on cheap curb appeal and furniture arrangement, clearing clutter, showing off to best advantage ideas (painting, etc.) lighting, etc. are usually quite sound...they are experts in this area (lots of bang for the buck) in realizing maximum sales price versus time on the market issues, which is of course what they earn their commission for, its all other advice that I don't trust them for!

k2

08:44AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
He had used the mud-jackers in his own home--he and his family are in the home for the long term. His recommendation was (I thought) well-intentioned; just not appropriate for my house, and (as you pointed out)--not for everyone.

Besides high commissions, probably my biggest gripe with realtors (as a group) is that a lot of them really don't understand contracts all that well. I am a believer in having an attorney look them over.

Personally, I've had both good and bad realtors. Some earn their money. But I keep wondering if the internet will eventually make inroads into the MLS database--making FSBO a better alternative.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

david_wv

12:46PM | 04/09/05
Member Since: 01/28/01
171 lifetime posts
Is it only the second floor? I would think that foundation problems would cause problems at least as bad on the first floor also.

If the problem is the ground moving, the cause could be anywhere between your house and the bottom of the slope. I've seen several instances where someone change the creek and caused erosion downstream. The erosion took away the support along the bottom of the slope next to the creek. The whole hillside, from ridge to creek, slowly moves down to the creek. Same thing happens when a new road is cut into the slope.
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